Melody – G Minor http://www.gminor.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:27:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.gminor.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-57-150x150.png Melody – G Minor http://www.gminor.org/ 32 32 Jazz album review: a Big Band tribute to the late Jimmy Heath http://www.gminor.org/jazz-album-review-a-big-band-tribute-to-the-late-jimmy-heath/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 15:20:40 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/jazz-album-review-a-big-band-tribute-to-the-late-jimmy-heath/ By Michael Ullman The students of Temple University in this beautiful big band tribute to the late saxophonist / composer Jimmy Heath, sound professional – tight and well rehearsed. They are joined by stars Joey DeFrancesco and Christian McBride. Terell Stafford and the Temple University Jazz Band: Without You, No Me, with Christian McBride and […]]]>

By Michael Ullman

The students of Temple University in this beautiful big band tribute to the late saxophonist / composer Jimmy Heath, sound professional – tight and well rehearsed. They are joined by stars Joey DeFrancesco and Christian McBride.

Terell Stafford and the Temple University Jazz Band: Without You, No Me, with Christian McBride and Joey DeFrancesco. (BCM & D documents)

When trumpeter Terell Stafford was hired by Temple University as director of jazz and instrument studies, he sought advice from the wisest man he knew: Jimmy Heath. Not surprising. Big band leader when he was only 20, adept and sometimes underrated saxophonist, as well as famous composer / arranger, Heath, who died on January 19, 2020 at the age of 93, was treated with a reverence understandable by his many students. Saxophonist Antonio Hart said of Jimmy, “He embodies what I think Christ is talking about in the Bible, how you’re supposed to let your life shine, how you’re supposed to treat people the way you want them to treat you. Composition of heather Without you, no Me, Hart says every time he plays the song he gets chills.

So it was no surprise that Stafford turned to his former boss for advice, or that he was eager to record a tribute to his mentor soon after his passing. Of Heath he said: “He gave me such great advice: ‘Just teach yourself. Teach who you are. Determine what you are doing, how you are doing it, and teach it. And that will be what the students will need. ‘ Of course, Covid stepped in, and it was a year late. Nonetheless, this recording was ultimately made by musicians who were all in the same room and performed with filters and covers on the bells of their horns. These students look professional – tight and well rehearsed. They do two lesser-known Heath compositions (they received less attention than “Gingerbread Boy”, that is), both from Heath’s Grammy-nominated album in 1992. Little Man Big Band. They are typical of his tunes: difficult to play, but easy to listen to. “Without You, No Me” begins with a rhythmic brass band and then, after a whirlwind of saxophones followed by a pause, a repeated motif takes place. The tightly muted trumpet section plays the melody until it becomes a bridge picked up, roughly, by the saxophones. It is a well-done piece, filled with a variety of rhythms and textures that the excellent soloists among the music students of Temple treat beautifully. “Voice of the Saxophone” begins with the band supporting a tenor saxophone. Soon everyone except the rhythm section gives up and the tenor saxophone is left to play the beautiful tune of the air. This is a special piece in Heath’s own recorded legacy – and it is done justice here.

The Temple University Jazz Band in action, taking top honors this month at the inaugural Jack Rudin Jazz Championship at Jazz at Lincoln Center. Photo: BCM & D Records

There’s more to this big band record. “The Wise Old Owl” was written by bassist Christian McBride in honor of the late basketball coach John Chaney. It starts with a funny bird pattern of jerky notes that continue behind a rather sad sounding melody, a descending pattern that reminded this listener Eeyore as much as an owl. But then McBride takes flight during his solo, demonstrating his ability to assert an effervescent swing despite the occasional complexity of the rhythms of a piece. McBride is one of the guests of honor, and he’s also featured in Louis Armstrong’s old staple “I Can’t Give You More Than Love.”. ” Here it is mainly devoted to McBride’s exuberant bass playing. Organist Joey DeFrancesco is featured in his composition, a tense and upbeat tune titled “In That Order”. Everyone plays in a catchy final, Ellington’s “Perdido”.


Michael ullman studied classical clarinet and was educated at Harvard, the University of Chicago and the University of Michigan, from which he earned a doctorate in English. Author or co-author of two books on jazz, he wrote on jazz and classical music for the Atlantic Monthly, New Republic, High fidelity, Stereophile, Boston phoenix, Boston Globe, and other places. His articles on Dickens, Joyce, Kipling and others have appeared in academic journals. For more than 20 years, he has written a bimonthly jazz column for Fanfare Magazine, for which he also criticizes classical music. At Tufts University, he mainly teaches modernist writers in the English department and the history of jazz and blues in the music department. He does not play the piano well.


Source link

]]>
Taiwanese band Oaeen’s new album, Strange Pool, is a team effort, Entertainment News & Top Stories http://www.gminor.org/taiwanese-band-oaeens-new-album-strange-pool-is-a-team-effort-entertainment-news-top-stories/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/taiwanese-band-oaeens-new-album-strange-pool-is-a-team-effort-entertainment-news-top-stories/ SINGAPORE – While Taiwanese actor Sodagreen sometimes seemed to be equated with his singer Wu Ching-feng, Oaeen reinforces the fact that they are a real team. The six-member group released their debut album, Strange Pool, on September 17. Sodagreen was formed in 2001 and their last album, Winter Endless, was released in 2015. The three-time […]]]>

SINGAPORE – While Taiwanese actor Sodagreen sometimes seemed to be equated with his singer Wu Ching-feng, Oaeen reinforces the fact that they are a real team.

The six-member group released their debut album, Strange Pool, on September 17. Sodagreen was formed in 2001 and their last album, Winter Endless, was released in 2015. The three-time winner of Best Group at the Golden Melody Awards changed their name in 2020 following a name-brand dispute with their former boss and producer Lin Wei-che.

The new 11-track work mixes folk, orchestral and electronic elements in their rock anthems and numerous numbers have appeared on the soundtrack of the Taiwanese miniseries The Pond (2021).

While Wu provides the lead vocals, the album also incorporates stories from the other five members: electric guitarist Kay Liu, acoustic guitarist Ho Ching-yang, bassist Claire Hsieh, drummer Shih Chun-wei, and keyboardist Kung Yu. -chi.

The six Oaeen members spoke to Singapore media via Zoom on September 17.

Hsieh contributed lyrics to I’m An Unpretentious Bassist and helped compose the groovy melody of I’m Weird. The 39-year-old said: “I haven’t composed music for a long time. At one point I felt very nervous, had little self-confidence and wondered what I was doing. I thought I was going to give it a try. “

Liu, 39, co-wrote the tune for Weak Brain Waves, which is about being overwhelmed by the deluge of chores brought on by everyday life.

“I don’t know if everyone is like this, but I get nervous when I have to answer this or that. We all have a limited capacity to handle tasks and it can be stressful having to deal with so many things,” did he declare. .

“When I think about this song, there is a feeling that I don’t want to worry about so many things.”

Shih, 42, who wrote Joyful Day, which conveys a sense of innocence and simplicity, joked that the song was his “baby” with Wu, as they both sing it.

Perhaps the darkest track on the album is the nerve-racking I Will Always Hate You, which expresses the frustrations of interacting with nasty people.

Ho, 39, who co-wrote the melody and lyrics, said: “People say they feel better and lighter after listening to this song. It’s about letting our emotions out.”

When asked how group members get rid of negative emotions, Wu, 39, recommended drinking a glass of lukewarm water in the morning and joked that he would also ask Shih for a shoulder massage. .

While a new group name may signal a fresh start, some things remain the same.

Wu has released solo albums, including Spaceman (2019), but is happy to be back with his bandmates. He said they didn’t feel like repeating themselves, but wanted to keep making music together.

Shih said, “Some people want to stay the same, but the world has changed. Others want to change, but they never do. I think we’re somewhere in between – there’s something special about it. this tension between changing and not changing. “

Strange Pool is available on platforms such as KKBox, Spotify, and Apple Music.


Source link

]]>
Grind2Hard Osh’a Continues To Deliver With New Melodic Track “More Than A Best Friend” http://www.gminor.org/grind2hard-osha-continues-to-deliver-with-new-melodic-track-more-than-a-best-friend/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 16:37:56 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/grind2hard-osha-continues-to-deliver-with-new-melodic-track-more-than-a-best-friend/ Dallas rapper Grind2Hard Osh’a has just released his latest song “More Than A Best Friend”. Listen ! Grind2Hard Osh’a, a Dallas native and burgeoning hip-hop star, took his personal experiences and turned them into a unique sound and story that is both relevant and fresh. His new track “More Than A Best Friend” embodies all […]]]>

Dallas rapper Grind2Hard Osh’a has just released his latest song “More Than A Best Friend”. Listen !

Grind2Hard Osh’a, a Dallas native and burgeoning hip-hop star, took his personal experiences and turned them into a unique sound and story that is both relevant and fresh.


His new track “More Than A Best Friend” embodies all of these elements, serving as his first new music since the release of his latest buzzing project titled Cobain pain.

“More Than A Best Friend” stays true to a musical style that Osh’a has indeed perfected, crossing melodic sounds with the courage and honesty that are at the heart of hip-hop.

“More than a best friend” is about someone you bond with on a different level. It’s about that special someone who brings out the best in you and you exchange energy, ”said Grind2Hard Osh’a. “You know their faults; they know your faults but neither of you judges yourself. You help each other defeat hidden demons that you wouldn’t share with anyone else. You can be vulnerable around this person without feeling like they are going to take advantage of you. It’s not just someone at random, it’s about someone you can love, learn with, grow with, build with, and manifest with.

Grind2Hard Osh’a has a big influence, ranging from Michael Jackson, Nina Simone, Luther Vandross and Tupac to Lil Wayne, Drake, Future, Z-Ro and Rich Homie Quan. At 17, he founded his own studio.

In 2018, he debuted with “Turnt To A Savage,” building an following through his viral social media videos. Osh’a has built organic social media following with nearly 187,000 followers on Instagram and an even larger number on TikTok, where his personality videos often go viral – amassing over half a million subscribers and over 6 million likes.

More recently, he released his project Cobain Pain to buzzing reviews, racking up over 50 million global streams and making it to Apple’s Top Hip-Hop / Rap and Global charts.

“More Than A Best Friend” is the first release in a series of music from one of hip-hop’s most promising groups.

















Source link

]]>
Bomba Estéréo: Album review already http://www.gminor.org/bomba-estereo-album-review-already/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/bomba-estereo-album-review-already/ When Bomba Estéreo started recording their sixth album in January 2020, Colombians were in the midst of violent protests sparked by strikes against political corruption and discontent with the government of President Iván Duque Marquez. The anger of students and indigenous activists had been simmering for some time: “What matters to us, more than the […]]]>

When Bomba Estéreo started recording their sixth album in January 2020, Colombians were in the midst of violent protests sparked by strikes against political corruption and discontent with the government of President Iván Duque Marquez. The anger of students and indigenous activists had been simmering for some time: “What matters to us, more than the virus or whatever, is the future of Colombia,” Maria told journalist. Alejandra Vega, student in Bogotá. Meanwhile, hundreds of miles away, in a small seaside town, Bomba Estéreo was also working to reshape her future. Flying in a tight-knit group of collaborators, including Colombian-Canadian singer-songwriter Lido Pimienta, Bomba Estéreo took refuge in the natural world and created Already, a concept album highlighting the environment as a means by which we can heal ourselves politically, socially and spiritually.

The resulting work is the most serious of the group to date. When Already invites us to the dancefloor, Bomba Estéreo asks that we proceed in conscience. In 2020, Bomba Estereo founder Simón Mejía starred in Sonic Forest, a documentary in defense of the Afro-Colombian and indigenous populations of the Colombian coast. Mejía also released a solo album, Mirla, under the nickname Monte, who inserted recordings of nature into instrumental tracks. While Bomba Estéreo was absorbed in the earth that surrounded them, Already took shape, pushing the band’s usual electro-tropical into another terrain. Drawing influences from marimba, Colombian folk, champeta and afrobeat, their sound isn’t necessarily new, but it’s bigger than ever. The most obvious example is “Conexión Total”, a collaboration with Nigerian star Yemi Alade. While Liliana Saumet and Alade speak out about the joys of being fully present, they are carried by Efraín Cuadrado’s gaita (also known as kuisi), which adds dazzling sound to synths and rhythm ready for the club.

Although environmentalism has long played a role in Bomba Estéreo’s music, they have never sounded more spiritually attuned, although this is not always effective. The opening of the “Agua” album begins with a call to the four elements: “Agua / Tierra / Aire / Fuego”, sings Saumet, in a style reminiscent of bullerengue, an Afro-Colombian oral tradition. The chorus is about dividing the album into sections dedicated to water, earth, air and fire, but it still comes out a bit hokey. Likewise, the title track draws on some ecotherapy-inspired positive affirmations in an attempt to make big statements about human disconnection, but the uninspiring EDM melody does nothing to get the lyrics off the ground.

The second half of Already aligns more convincingly with his vision. “Tamborero” is a rhapsodic celebration of Colombia’s percussive prowess. On “Tierra”, Saumet elegantly sings the imminent disappearance of the earth; the melody of the marimba is so sweet that you almost forget how devastating it all is. And on the closer album “Mamo Manuel Nieves (Sierra Nevada de Santa Maria)”, they pass the microphone to an indigenous shaman from the Kogi community. Saumet and Mejía had just completed an old ritual known as pagamento, or “payment” to land, when they invited Nieves to the studio to record a message for the world. The largely spoken word is a fresh and timely addition to an album of global bangers; it sits in a space similar to Mejía’s solo work, drawing inspiration from samples of the fierce winds and birds of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. For a group that consistently invokes the tropical indigenous aesthetic, it is important to see them center the voices of local collaborators.

Activism and collective healing are at the heart of Already, and while Bomba Estéreo’s fusion of supple rhythms and heavy themes doesn’t always work, Saumet is a compelling presence throughout. As she opens “Ahora”, surrounded by the sounds of the rainforest, she offers a mantra to all who struggle: “I am here. I’m sitting in the right place, at the right time, at the right time. Let your heart open. It’s a simple meditation on finding balance, and the song that follows, a singing fusion of synths and guitar to a cumbia beat, makes it clear: they found answers in the world around them.


Buy: Crude Trade

(Pitchfork earns a commission on purchases made through affiliate links on our site.)

Catch up with every Saturday with 10 of our top rated albums of the week. Subscribe to the 10 to Hear newsletter here.


Source link

]]>
Musician Loolwa Khazzoom mixes punk with Iraqi melodies – J. http://www.gminor.org/musician-loolwa-khazzoom-mixes-punk-with-iraqi-melodies-j/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 17:24:35 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/musician-loolwa-khazzoom-mixes-punk-with-iraqi-melodies-j/ Long before San Francisco-raised Loolwa Khazzoom followed her muse and devoted herself to music full-time, she used an international array of songs in her campaign to raise awareness of Jewish diversity. Drawing on her family’s roots in Iraq’s former Jewish community, the Lowell High School graduate has spent more than two decades championing an inclusive […]]]>

Long before San Francisco-raised Loolwa Khazzoom followed her muse and devoted herself to music full-time, she used an international array of songs in her campaign to raise awareness of Jewish diversity.

Drawing on her family’s roots in Iraq’s former Jewish community, the Lowell High School graduate has spent more than two decades championing an inclusive view of the Jewish people through her writing and leadership of the Jewish Multicultural Project, which she founded in Los Angeles and brought to East Bay in the mid-1990s.

Khazzoom has often associated his programs with songs in Ladino, Judeo-Arabic, Aramaic, Amharic and Hebrew, illustrating that the diaspora encompassed worlds far beyond the Ashkenazi kingdom of Eastern and Central Europe.

Yet, for various reasons, she put her own music on the back burner over and over again.

“I was a musician by birth, and at 3 months I started singing harmonies for Iraqi prayers,” she said. “I was singing before I started speaking, but over the years my music has continued to be shelved. “

These days, songwriting takes center stage in her life as she has created a vast body of music with her band Iraqis In Pajamas, which released their fourth album, “Stripped Bare”, on September 15th. As the title suggests, the album is a bare-bones, vocals and bass project combining the original lyrics and music of Khazzoom with Iraq. selichot, prayers of supplication and nostalgia that are recited before and during the Holidays.

Drawn to the Seattle area by his ever-present feminist riot grrrl heritage, Khazzoom has refined an emotional repertoire that blends ancient Mesopotamian Jewish sacred melodies and powerful post-punk chords.

Drawing on electric bass and singing in English, Judeo-Arabic and Hebrew, she explores thorny topics such as cancer, domestic violence, prejudice, mental illness, street harassment and national exile. The topics are often heavy and the sound of Iraqis In Pajamas can be fierce, but just as the blues turns wailing into a vehicle of community celebration, Khazzoom’s music carries an uplifting kick.

The group’s name itself transforms the trick of transmuting a slight into a playful badge of honor. Khazzoom first adopted the nickname when she was living in Israel earlier this year, one of the times in her life when she was trying to focus on music. She stayed in her Iraqi-born grandfather’s apartment in Ramat Gan, a town often referred to as Little Baghdad since the 1950s because many Iraqi Jews settled there after the mass evacuation of Operation Ezra and Nehemiah.

“I would go out to a club and people would ask me where I live, and when I told them Ramat Gan, they would say, ‘Oh, Iraqis in pajamas,’ because of the Iraqi custom of changing into clothes when they came home from home. job. It was pejorative, but I found it hilarious.

Loolwa Khazzoom (Photo / Moriel O’Conner)

The image resonated doubly because working from home meant that Khazzoom herself was some sort of Iraqi in pajamas. She has performed several times in Israel under this name. But her writing and activist work – she edited the first English anthology of essays on identity by women of Jewish descent from North Africa and the Middle East, “The Flying Camel” in 2003 – continued to intercede with his musical activities.

With her move to the Seattle area in 2015, she relaunched the name, gathered a band, and began to make inroads into the local scene. Preparing for a big push in the spring of 2020 with the release of a single in March followed by a series of concerts, Khazzoom has been entrenched by the pandemic.

The downtime turned into a period of intense creativity fueled by what she called her “fierce determination to never lose my music again”.

She has released a series of online albums and on September 19 will be launching a new online concert series, Kaffe Khazzoom. His new Patreon site invites listeners into his songwriting process. And a budding collaboration with a guitarist recently arrived from Kuwait could open a new musical scope.

“I don’t know where it’s going, but there are so many possibilities,” Khazzoom said. “Combining Judeo-Arab music with an Arab musician could lead to so much wealth. “


Source link

]]>
Pranutan Bahl revisits the timeless melody of his grandmother Nutan | Bollywood http://www.gminor.org/pranutan-bahl-revisits-the-timeless-melody-of-his-grandmother-nutan-bollywood/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:38:14 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/pranutan-bahl-revisits-the-timeless-melody-of-his-grandmother-nutan-bollywood/ Actor Pranutan Bahl, who stars in Helmet, admits she was indeed nervous about the whole performance when she realizes she was putting herself in the shoes of a legend. By Juhi Chakraborty UPDATED SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 1:08 PM IST Pranutan Bahal paid tribute to her late grandmother, the old actor Nutan, by sharing a video […]]]>

Actor Pranutan Bahl, who stars in Helmet, admits she was indeed nervous about the whole performance when she realizes she was putting herself in the shoes of a legend.

By Juhi Chakraborty

UPDATED SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 1:08 PM IST

Pranutan Bahal paid tribute to her late grandmother, the old actor Nutan, by sharing a video of her dancing to the popular song Mora Gora Ang Laile from the movie Bandini (1963).

Dressed in all-black salwar kameez, Pranutan featured graceful movements and added alongside the video: “It’s really special because it’s my grandfather’s song (sic).”

An excerpt from the song, Mora Gora Ang Laile

Speaking of recreating the song, sung by Lata Mangeshkar, Pranutan said: “It was a wonderful experience and I was obviously very nervous because it is a classic song. We all know he’s portrayed by an absolute legend, who is my grandfather. This is one of my absolute favorite songs. I am learning Bharatnatyam but I wanted to do Kathak for this song.

Daughter of Mohnish Bahal, the actor admits she was indeed nervous about the whole performance when she realizes she was putting herself in the shoes of a legend.

“I didn’t have a lot of time to prepare for it, so I was more nervous. But I just wanted to do it once and see how it would go, ”she adds.

Pranutan, who made his Bollywood debut with Notebook in 2019, says she is overwhelmed by the love she received for her tribute to her grandmother.

“I feel honored when the audience talks about my resemblance to Grandma. She was one of a kind, and I really enjoy her performance, with Bandini being my favorite. I am overwhelmed by all the love and beautiful responses that I had during my performance. A big hug to all my fans, ”she concludes.

close


Source link

]]>
Nordstrom x Levi’s pop-up will feature 3 designer versions of classics http://www.gminor.org/nordstrom-x-levis-pop-up-will-feature-3-designer-versions-of-classics/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 19:24:18 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/nordstrom-x-levis-pop-up-will-feature-3-designer-versions-of-classics/ Nordstrom’s ongoing themed pop-up series, dubbed Pop-In @ Nordstrom, has been presenting Levi’s world for decades through the lens of three designers with a legacy celebration experience. The limited-time pop-up store will launch on September 17 in select Nordstroms (as well as via the Nordstrom site) and offer visitors the ability to shop exclusive collections […]]]>

Nordstrom’s ongoing themed pop-up series, dubbed Pop-In @ Nordstrom, has been presenting Levi’s world for decades through the lens of three designers with a legacy celebration experience.

The limited-time pop-up store will launch on September 17 in select Nordstroms (as well as via the Nordstrom site) and offer visitors the ability to shop exclusive collections from Collina Strada, Melody Ehsani and Thompson Street Studio while exploring Levi’s Authorized labels. Vintage and Levi’s RED.

“We’re excited to partner with Levi’s this fall for the latest iteration of Pop-In @ Nordstrom,” said Olivia Kim, vice president of creative and home projects at Nordstrom, in a press release. “I have long admired their strong brand heritage and we are proud to use this partnership as a platform for emerging female-led brands like Collina Strada, Melody Ehsani and Thompson Street Studio to express their distinct perspectives in creating unique pieces which we know the Nordstrom customer will love.

All three designers were enlisted to offer their unique interpretations of classic and vintage Levi’s pieces. These reimagined pieces, along with the RED and Vintage selections, will reside in the boutique alongside accessories and home décor items from a variety of emerging labels.

Below, check out a selection of editorial photos of the designers’ work, as well as an overview of the RED and Vintage options.

Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s
Levi's
Image via Nordstrom x Levi’s

The full list of brands included in the Pop-In @ Nordstrom x Levi’s experience includes A Bronze Age, Collina Strada, DMC, Kishmish, Machete, Maria La Rosa, Meji Meji, Melody Ehsani, Primecut, Recreation Center, Rit, Siizu and Thompson Street Studio. The experience will be available in nine Nordstrom locations from September 17 through October 17. Participating locations include stores in New York, Austin, Chicago, and more.

Click here for the full list.


Source link

]]>
Hypnotized by the prayers of Kol Nidre and Yom Kippur http://www.gminor.org/hypnotized-by-the-prayers-of-kol-nidre-and-yom-kippur/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 11:11:50 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/hypnotized-by-the-prayers-of-kol-nidre-and-yom-kippur/ At sunset on Wednesday, as Jews around the world begin the traditional Kol Nidre (All Vows) service, we will inaugurate the most solemn day of Yom’s 10 days of repentance, Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement). The Kol Nidre Service and Yom Kippur Day Services contain some of the most beautiful musical prayers we experience […]]]>

At sunset on Wednesday, as Jews around the world begin the traditional Kol Nidre (All Vows) service, we will inaugurate the most solemn day of Yom’s 10 days of repentance, Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement). The Kol Nidre Service and Yom Kippur Day Services contain some of the most beautiful musical prayers we experience every year. I am always fascinated by these services.

Although we are not in a synagogue this year, my wife and I will be able to enjoy the often haunting melodies, through the wonders of Jewish television broadcasting services from our favorite central synagogue in Manhattan.


The opening prayer tomorrow night, Kol Nidre, is haunting and is repeated three times at the start of the service. I can never get this prayer out of my head.

According to Britannica.com, “The recitation of Kol Nidre actually comes before the start of Yom Kippur (since it is forbidden to negotiate business on a festival), but the custom is to repeat the Kol Nidre chant three times – to both to fill the time until sunset, and to make sure that any latecomer to the service can hear it at least once.

The rest of the service is filled with several other haunting melodies and three of them, Avienu Malkeinu, Al Chet and Ashamnu, repeat themselves several times over the next 24 hours. Each of these melodies, which can often involve light taps to the chest, can strengthen our commitment to confess and atone for our sins of the past year.

Britannica.com specifies that “The traditional confessional prayer, the Viddui, consists of two parts, the Ashamnu and the Al Chet, which we read aloud on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Ashamnu (translated as “we have transgressed” or “we are guilty”) is an abbreviated confession, an alphabetic acrostic, and written in the first person plural. We recite this confessional in the plural to represent our shared responsibility and guilt in all of our lives and our missteps. We also share this confessional as a reminder that forgiveness is also shared. “

Among some of the phrases in these prayers are those that should capture all of our transgressions. Here are a few, which are part of the song and the tapping of the chest: “We have been callous; We have justified bad decisions; We have killed our impulse to do good; We acted out of fear instead of love; We were silent when we should have spoken.

I never thought about it until I looked closely at prayers, but according to Rabbi Shraga in his article “Exploring the Al Chet Prayer”, “In Judaism we say if you can get to the root of the problem , you can eliminate it. entirely. This is the purpose of the ‘Al Chet’ prayer that we say so many times during Yom Kippur services. Its 44 statements are not a list of errors, but rather identify the roots of errors.

The haunting chorus of Ashamnu and Al Chet prayers is sung at least 10 times during Kol Nidre and Yom Kippur services. In English, the refrain is “For all these, God of pardon, forgive us, forgive us, expiate us”.

The only other persistent and fascinating prayer for me from the Kol Nidre and Yom Kippur services is “Avinu Malkeinu”, Our Father Our King. I always let the services hum at least one version of this prayer, as the melody captures the essence of the holiday for me.

I hear the words and am immediately humbled and contrite as I seek forgiveness during this time of mass confession. In this prayer we beg Our Father, Our King to hear our prayers and forgive us all our sins so that we can be inscribed in the Safer Chaim – Book of Life.

But at the end of services, I always ask myself, “Will I be forgiven?” Am I going to repeat the same list of sins I had to face this year? I can only hope that when the melodies begin next year, I will be a little less sinful and purer of heart.

Steven Gaynes is a writer from Fairfield, and his “In the Suburbs” appears every Friday. He can be contacted at stevengaynes44@gmail.com.


Source link

]]>
Watch Mudvayne put on their first show in 12 years http://www.gminor.org/watch-mudvayne-put-on-their-first-show-in-12-years/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 04:50:10 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/watch-mudvayne-put-on-their-first-show-in-12-years/ Mudvayne returned to the stage for the first time in 12 years this weekend. Nu-metal favorites headlined the September 11 night of the Inkcarceration 2021 festival, playing a stacked ensemble filled with fan favorites from the 2000s. Mudvayne’s classic lineup of vocalist Chad Gray, guitarist Greg Tribbett, bassist Ryan Martinie and drummer Matt McDonough smashed […]]]>

Mudvayne returned to the stage for the first time in 12 years this weekend. Nu-metal favorites headlined the September 11 night of the Inkcarceration 2021 festival, playing a stacked ensemble filled with fan favorites from the 2000s.

Mudvayne’s classic lineup of vocalist Chad Gray, guitarist Greg Tribbett, bassist Ryan Martinie and drummer Matt McDonough smashed the main stage of incarceration on Saturday night, headlining A Day to Remember, Chevelle, Asking Alexandria and more. The Inkcarceration Festival is celebrated annually at the former Ohio State Reformatory where Shawshank’s Redemption was filmed.

See the full setlist and fan videos below.

Setlist Mudvayne (September 11, 2021):

1. Do not fall
2. -1
3. Death blooms
4. Internal primates forever
5. Silence
6. A new game
7. Prod
8. A Cinderella Story
9. Dull boy
10. World so cold
11. Determined
12. Nothing to Gein
13. Happy?
14. Dig

Mudvayne – Do Not Fall Live – Inkcarceration 2021

Mudvayne – World So Cold Live – Inkcarceration 2021

Mudvayne – Happy Live – Inkcarceration 2021

Mudvayne – Dig Live – Inkcarceration 2021

Mudvayne officially announced their reunion in April 2021. The group is also set to perform at this year’s Louder Than Life and Welcome to Rockville festivals.

The best metal songs of every year since 1970

See Loudwire’s picks for top metal songs of each year since 1970.


Source link

]]>
Imagine John Lennon at 50: a deceptively simple ballad, a lasting emblem of hope – Opinion http://www.gminor.org/imagine-john-lennon-at-50-a-deceptively-simple-ballad-a-lasting-emblem-of-hope-opinion/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 08:23:36 +0000 http://www.gminor.org/imagine-john-lennon-at-50-a-deceptively-simple-ballad-a-lasting-emblem-of-hope-opinion/ Leigh Carriage (The Conversation) Lismore, Australia ● Thu, September 9, 2021 2021-09-09 15:20 0 6d81e3df9943227aba70bd118d4f6220 2 Opinion music, John-Lennon, Imagine, solo artist, legacies To free 1971 was a tumultuous year. The counter-cultural movement of the 1960s was still being felt. Protests took place against the Vietnam War and in August Australia and New Zealand withdrew […]]]>

Leigh Carriage (The Conversation)

Lismore, Australia ●
Thu, September 9, 2021

2021-09-09
15:20
0
6d81e3df9943227aba70bd118d4f6220
2
Opinion
music, John-Lennon, Imagine, solo artist, legacies
To free

1971 was a tumultuous year. The counter-cultural movement of the 1960s was still being felt. Protests took place against the Vietnam War and in August Australia and New Zealand withdrew their troops.

Apollo 15 landed on the moon. Feminist Gloria Steinem made her first speech to women in America. Switzerland organized a referendum on women’s suffrage. In New York City, John Lennon sat down in front of a brown Model Z upright piano and began writing what would become an intergenerational, transnational phenomenon – and perhaps the sweetest of protest songs – Imagine.

Imagine was recorded on May 27 at Lennon’s new home studio. The song was released worldwide as part of the album of the same name (co-produced by Lennon, his wife Yoko Ono and Phil Spector) on September 9.

For three minutes and three seconds, the lyrics of this sweet ballad present a vision of unity and hope. It is a space in which to dream of real change in the world.

As with all songs, the interpretations are as broad as the listeners. For many, it is a call for peace; for others, it is a prayer.

The lyrics of the verses, partly inspired by the poetry of Ono, remove all the central components that seem to separate us: violence, hatred, borders, poverty, greed, governments, religion, consumerism and capitalism.

The last verse offers a vision of a unified world at peace.

You can tell i’m a dreamer

But I’m not the only one

I hope one day you will join us

And the world will live as one

Imagine would become Lennon’s best-selling single of his solo career. In 2004, Rolling stone ranked it third on his list of the greatest songs of all time, saying “we need this more than he ever dreamed of”.

This photo taken on June 30, 1966 shows British band The Beatles, (left to right) Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, George Harrison and John Lennon, performing at their concert at the Budokan in Tokyo. (JIJI PRESS / AFP / -)

Musical unboxing

Imagine is often used to teach music to beginning students, but it would be a mistake to assume that this is just a simple soft rock piano ballad.

This perception is due to Lennon’s highly efficient craftsmanship. As a hymn to peace, the song sounds simple, but digs a little deeper and you find layers of complexity and nuance.

Imagine was written in the key of C major, which has neither sharp nor flat, so it is melodically and harmonically playable and widely accessible.

The melody is made up of small intervals (the difference in pitch between two notes) and small repeating patterns (a fragment of melody repeated, manipulated or repositioned throughout the melody), all within a singable range of one octave.

The song’s introduction sets up a slight sway between harmonic resolution and tension, like waves on a beach.

The third, longer sentence (“Imagine everyone”) enters a passage of unresolved tension. This culminates in a state of harmonic balance, like a standing broom. It can fall one way or another – towards resolution (the next verse) or towards tension (the chorus). This balance intensifies as the rhythm section pauses and Lennon sings in falsetto.

Imagine there is no heaven

It’s easy if you try

No hell below us

Above us, only the sky Imagine everyone

Live for today

The opening piano chords also create a feeling of tension before relapsing into resolution, in line with the dreamlike feeling of the lyrics. The third sentence, “imagine everyone” begins on the four chords and maintains that tension until “live for today” hits the ground, creating more stability.

Perhaps the most distinctive part of Imagine is the short piano riff between the vocal lines. This riff uses only three notes – A, A # and B – called “chromatic passing notes”. Your ear thinks that these notes will go up, up to the C chord. Instead, Lennon brings the listener’s ear to the note of the Sol melody, creating a gentle sense of unpredictability.

Imagine transports the listener. The lyrics cheer up. The easy climbs and descents of melodic comfort. Lennon’s familiar voice is reassuring.

A balm in times of crisis
Imagine has inspired an exceptional range of covers, sung by everyone from Elton John to Madonna. The interpretation of the American singer Eva Cassidy remains particularly preferred. His expression and subtle reinterpretation of the melody, his choice of notes and his phrasing are breathtaking.

In times of crisis, people often turned to this song. Queen took over Imagine the day after Lennon died in 1980; Neil Young played it in the aftermath of 9/11.

After the 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris, people gathered in the streets as a man quietly played the song on a piano decorated with a peace symbol.

In March of last year, at the start of the pandemic, Gal Gadot and other celebrities released a now ironically celebrated and much-criticized version.

And last September, Melbourne students wrote their own version:

Imagine there is no Corona

And we can see our friends

Our interdependence and our trust in each other are our greatest strengths. 50 years after Lennon wrote the song, Imagine will be with us all the way: a lasting emblem of hope.

The writer is Senior Lecturer in Music, Southern Cross University

his article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Facebook Fights To Retain Giphy Featured By Most Viewed Dog Owner: ‘Dog Whisperer’ Cesar Millan Trains People To Record Lowest Positive Coronavirus Test Rate Rom-com Queen Kate Hudson Takes A Turn ‘Brave’ with a dark fairy tale in Venice Fried fortunes: Indonesian street food hawkers are more successful than you think Bank Neo Commerce considers Rp 2.5 trillion in rights issue At least 41 killed in prison fire near Jakarta “You’re a fool”: Australian duck can mimic human sound Dozens of Rohingya refugees flee Medan shelter

This article appeared in thejakartapost.com with the headline “Soeharto: Modern Indonesian Giant Who Left a Legacy of Violence and Corruption – Opinion – The Jakarta Post”. Click to read: https://www.thejakartapost.com/academia/2021/09/07/soeharto-the-giant-of-modern-indonesia-who-left-a-legacy-of-violence-and-corruption. html.

Download The Jakarta Post app for faster and easier access to news:
Android: http://bit.ly/tjp-android
iOS: http://bit.ly/tjp-ios

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.


Source link

]]>